Bo Jackson – Net Worth, Money and More

By  |  0 Comments

 Net Worth: $16 Million

images (3)

“ Set your goals high, and don’t stop till you get there” are the words of the greatest athlete Bo Jackson . Vincent Edward “Bo” Jackson known as a greatest athlete of his generation was  well known player of football and baseball.

Jackson was born and raised in Bessemer, Alabama on  November 30, 1962 . He is a retired American baseball and football player and  the only athlete to be named an All-Star in two major American sports. Jackson played in both the NFL and MLB.

Early life

The eighth of Florence Jackson Bond’s 10 children, he was named after her favourite television actor, Vince Edwards .During his childhood days Jackson was usually described as “wild boar hog,” as he would constantly get into trouble which was eventually shortened to “Bo.”He  attended McAdory High School in McCalla where  he had hit twenty home runs in twenty-five games for McAdory’s baseball team during his senior season, becoming a two-time state champion in decathlon.

College

In june 1982, Jackson was selected by the New York Yankees in the second round of 1982 Major League Baseball Draft ,he tuned it down to attend Auburn University on a football scholarship . Initially recruited by head coach Pat Dye ,later assisted Bobby Wallace, proving to be a tremendous athlete in both football as well as baseball at Auburn.

In Baseball ,Jackson batted .401 with 17 home runs and 43 RBIs in 1985. He won victory for Auburn with a 4-for-5 performance in the year 1985 against the Georgia Bulldogs at FolyField in Athens, Geogia. Because of separating his shoulder during football season, Jackson missed the 1984 season.

In football, Jackson ran for 4,303 career yards during his time playing for the Auburn Tigers football team. He finished his career with an average of 6.6 yards per carry setting the SEC (South Eastern Conference) record.  In 1982 Auburn won the game played in Boston College in the Tangerine Bowl as Jackson rushed 14 times for 64 yards and 2 TDs.

As a sophomore in 1983, Bo rushed for 1,213 yards on 158 carries, for an average of 7 yards per carry, creating 2nd best single-season average in SEC history. During the Auburn-Alabama game Jackson finished the season by winning the Sugar Bowl, where he was named the Most Valuable Player. In 1984, was a year of Jackson’s injuries of and  he earned Most Valuable Player honors at the Liberty Bowl. Marking the second best single-season performance in SEC history in 1985, Jackson rushed for 1,786 yards. In the same year, he averaged 6.4 yards per rush, known to be the best single-season average in SEC  history. He was also awarded the Heisman Trophy in what was considered the closest margin of victory ever in the history of the award, winning over University of Iowa quarterback Chuck Long.

He ended his career at Auburn with 4,575 all-purpose yards and 45 total touchdowns, 43 rushing and 2 receiving, with a 6.6 yards per carry average. On October 31, 1992 Jackson’s football number 34 was officially retired at Auburn in a halftime ceremony being one of only three numbers retired at Auburn. In 2007, Jackson was ranked #8 on ESPN’s Top 25 Players In College Football History list.

images

 

Professional sports career

Jackson was selected with the first overall pick of the 1986 NFL Draft but he opted to play baseball for the Kansas City Royals. It was only in 1989 that Jackson began to show his true potential, when he was voted to start for the American League All-Star team, and was named the game’s MVP for his play on both offense and defence .

Jackson’s 171 strikeouts in 1989 tied him for tenth most strikeouts in a season for a right hand batter since 1893. Jackson performed his famous “wall run” on July 11, 1990 against the Orioles ,when he caught a ball approximately 2–3 strides away from the wall. In 1991 the Royals were unwilling to pay $2.377 million salary to rehabilitate Jackson’s football injury , later released him.

images (2)

“Bo Knows..”

He became a sports icon during the late 1980s and early ’90s and even had his own Nike ad campaign, called “Bo Knows.”

Injury and Comeback

In 1991, during a playoff game with the Raiders, Jackson suffered a serious injury that required him have his hip replaced. The injury ended his football career and seriously threatened his baseball career. However, Jackson returned to baseball with the White Sox in 1993 and won the AL Comeback Player of the Year Award. The 1995 season began, Jackson retired from pro sports.

Net worth

Jackson has a net worth of 16 million which he accumulated through his athletic abilities and during his baseball and football career. Jackson earned 6.8 million and 6.1 million through his baseball and football career respectively.Jackson starred in various television films and commercials during his long and illustrious career.Playing for the kansas city royals jackson earned $2,323,000 and earned $9,381,000 playing for the chicago white sox.During his last season bo was paid $1,000,000 by the california angels.Jackson is also one of the investors who owns Burr Ridge Bank & Trust in Burr Ridge, IL. Jackson has recently started the annual Bo Bikes Bama charity to help out the people who were affected by the terrible tornadoes that ripped through Alabama back in 2011.

images (1)

 

Life after sports

In 1995, Jackson went back to Auburn and graduated in December  with a bachelor of science in family and child development. Later opened a motorcycle shop and went into partnership in restaurant. Presently he serves as president of Sports Medicine Council.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close